Dave West talks playing bass guitar with George Michael, Wham, Hazel O'Connor & much much more....

Dave West talks playing bass guitar with George Michael, Wham, Hazel O'Connor & much much more....

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hello everyone i'm chris mars and welcome back to my channel so today i've got a great interview with dave west who started off his career as bass player with the wham and he talks about his relationship with george michael and andrew ridgeley how he started in the music industry and what has led him to become now the managing director of one of the uk's leading online recording equipment distributors at studio spares so do watch this great interview leave your comments below don't forget to subscribe and look forward to seeing you again in the next interview enjoy dave west hello and welcome to my little video how are you doing nice to see you how are you i'm good how are you sir are you well yeah yeah very good all things considered my second jab i'm feeling like death warmed up but i'm okay [Laughter] you still look beautiful oh thank you very much yes as always yes so uh yeah it's great to have you here on my on my video channel uh thank you for asking yeah well thanks really appreciate you uh doing this so tell me about your musical past and your present and what where are you going where did you start how did you start your musical journey when did it all start and where did you start oh right okay so um i was talking about this the other day actually with uh a friend of mine uh i actually i started when i was really really young chris you know when you get tied into something and then you just can't let it go yeah i well actually i was a guitarist like most frustrated bass players um i i started i started life as a quite a poor guitarist if i'm honest but a friend of mine uh gary his name was he was in a band that was uh signed i think i think i think i was just 16 and he was in a band that was signed and you know they were signed to emi and they were going off and doing dates and everything and i was sort of sat at home with the guitar still learning smoke on the water or whatever it was and um and then one day he called me and he said dave he said do you play bass i said good god no why would i possibly play back play bass and he goes oh it's just our bass players left and we've got these dates in portugal is it braga stadium actually and we were looking for looking for a bass player i went oh yeah i can play bass so uh so that was how i started really so uh i went down we were we were managed by a guy called um joe seabrook this is in watford and he was i think it was a bodyguard for for um for hugh cornwall and for jagger as well so he was he had a way into the into the industry so to speak and he managed to band and yeah and within weeks i was playing on a stage in braga stadium at the age of 16 so of course that ties you into never wanting to do anything else in your life yeah so i went on from there um of course when we came back that band split up you know the guitarist met somebody and you know you know the old story and um but i yeah my appetite had been you know wetted and um so i uh i looked around i joined another band and then i hooked up with some uh some other friends in fact it was a a drummer that came in a guy called paul paul ridgely and um yeah we we were quite good buddies and his brother andrew was had a had a band the executive and his best mate was a guy called george michael or yogg as he was in those days and um i then got tied into the very very early wham stuff so uh i then went and played on some of their demos and you know whilst my band on the other side was just being signed as well and and uh yeah and it sort of all started from there really um i think uh a short time after all the usual that band split up and uh and i i think uh i think i then started to be much more of a rather than being a band member i started to be a bit more of a gun for higher so i i ended up playing with um do you remember hazel o'connor of course yes yeah the wonderful hazel who i love and she's absolutely fantastic i ended up playing with hazel for about 10 years on and off on different tours and things so that was a a great pleasure um i played with the q-tips in their second uh um uh i suppose form um pretty much as paul went they they carried on yeah that they had a variety of things after that but yeah so i played with them for a few years as well and they were great times there's some really good farm and yeah i got caught up loads of different acts and played on those of different things for different people and yeah generally had a really good time so that was sort of my early career which was playing bass and touring and doing all the bad things that you do when you're young and in a band really so from the age of about 16 that's when you started up until which which age did you carry on playing until before you start probably i mean i was earning i mean i made a living as being a musician yeah probably mid to late 20s so um and actually i probably could have carried on those there was lots of opportunities but you know i mean i was i was writing and just like to produce as well which i i i got into in a a big way and i wrote actually i'll do some bits with hazel and um bonnie tyler and and and a few others which was you know really good fun and enjoyable but i i as i got into it i don't know i think probably if i'm really honest which i should be is that well number one i wasn't a great producer that that's been really honest if i was that great i'd probably still be doing it today but i wasn't and uh but i loved the gear and i loved the studio and i loved just the recording process i think i've got chanuk coming across cereals i'll get them around here as well yes sorry if you can hear that that's right um but yeah and and i think um i i really i should say i love the gear i love the process but i i didn't like the working till four in the morning i i i met my wife around that time and i was starting to settle down and i just got a bit sick of you know the politics in that was you know often when i'm in studios and everything and i just thought why am i doing this i never earned that a great deal of money either so and then i was approached actually to help somebody build this video and just get some advice on some of the gear to go into it and um yeah and we built the studio and it was brilliant i really really loved you know everything from an empty room through to you know a finished studio and uh and i then started to get into sort of selling and distributing equipment um which is where i am even today so i've been doing that for probably since i was in my sort of early mid 30s i've been at that so that's nearly three years um yeah i mean it's it's a good 20 odd years so um and yeah and yeah i've done some amazing things i've met some incredible people and you know looked after you know the likes of pete townsend and you know all sorts of different people it's just been it's been wonderful so um yeah i've been quite blessed i suppose you know you know i'm i'm still enjoying it today excellent do you still play yeah love playing um yeah i think more for the fun of it i mean there was a period i suppose we all go through it where we have to you know pay for a bit of money so um i certainly played and um with a few function bands here and there which was quite good fun actually really really good discipline you have to learn lines properly and when it's a good band especially when you're doing sort of club and disco stuff you know you find yourself playing bernard with edward's lines you know you you you have your wits about you and yeah so yes beautiful discipline to to do that sort of stuff and you know i love doing all that um and i i often uh and i go out and play with i have a band at the moment which of course like the rest of us hasn't been out for a good year um and yeah and we you know we cover some stuff and everything actually more things like um some marcus miller uh stuff right through to a bit of steely dan through to some uh out and out funk stuff which is good fun so yeah um so i i love to play and i i still do sessions for people and and i still in fact i played on hazel's last album actually bizarrely two or three tracks on there which was sort of quite nice and i suppose with the way things are you know you can you can easily uh you know somebody can shout out you know they wanted to play on the track and you can and the way everything's set up now it's so easy just to mess around with it play with it send it back yeah dave can you read me that bit or you know maybe just need to be a bit more soulful i don't quite like the sound whatever it is it's oh yeah no problem i can i can just you know i can just replay it or whatever and there's no pressure it's not like you used to be in studios where they wanted they wanted the whole thing down in half an hour an hour and i would expect you to be able to you know get a great take in that time but everything was so expensive 30 years ago it cost a fortune to go into studios yeah because now it's so cheap and you can have it in your laptop and produce a whole album absolutely yeah and it happens all the time of course um do you have any any particular guitars that you uh you cherish or you still you would never let go of any particular bass guitar yeah i have i have well i have it with my wife here i have a couple of bases oh hidden away in the water now i i have um i have the original jazz that um i used on uh the very first version of kelly's whisper and wearing rap which was uh and i can't out and actually yes at that point you had seen better days and you know i've had it worked on a few times but it sits quite proudly upstairs and i just you know i just can't i haven't got the heart to get rid of it but did you you play on the original you played on the original so i played on the demos i don't unfortunately i didn't play on the the the hits the actual physical one that everybody listens to but um i i i played on i actually have a version which i've you know well this this there's a bit of a story behind this because this is quite interesting so i actually have um when when i was asked to do it there was myself and a guy called paul mix who is a producer and he's um uh by his own ambition he's still a punk at the age of like well i suppose he's late fifties the same as me uh um and he had the he had original i think you and i spoke about this he had the original teach four track yeah as well yeah and he was like the only one in watford that had one so um when um uh uh andy and yoga to say george and andrew had said uh that they want to do these tracks you know the obvious choice was to grab uh paul and he's teach and his dramatics i think it was you know the little dramatic strum machines um and um you know we were part of that yeah yeah definitely the flashback that is great yeah i mean it was great and he had this i can't remember the reverb we had this little box reverb thing and it was just i i i had like a slap echo on it or something it was really sort of crude and being up at the time it was it was amazing you know that we could actually pick it up and take it somewhere with us rather than having it you know this great unit you know racked up so yeah we all we piled down to um uh andrew's house uh in bushy and we we planned to record um wham rap because we sort of knew it and we've been working around the the chic um good times baseline and oh yeah yeah it's happening and george george is a bass player i mean he was he used to borrow my bass for his band executive and um so he knew his stuff and he had a really good ear for for uh anything to do uh the bottom end he was just he just man was a genius to be quite honest even you know from way before he uh became famous he was absolutely genius knew what he wanted but anyway so we went as we went in and we did wham rap and uh there was me on base and you played the guitar and went to and dramatic so it was like we were like a little duo with a drum machine and um so we we knocked the groove out and then uh george did a like uh the vocal which was remarkably like the single in the end actually was quite close to that except for i think he said the word um if i'm allowed to swear i think he said the word in in the original rap so that was major all right um so he um so we did that and then i think paul uh who i spoke about earlier the drummer and a couple of friends came around and did the backing vocals and the shouty rap bit um and it was all good fun and and we were sort of just about to pack up and um george said oh we've got this other idea can we just you put a bit down and then um so they just showed me that it was basically you know a four four chord turn around and so we started playing it and andrew obviously worked on it before there was a definite line there and i thought well this is quite nice and we put it down and we just went over it a few times and uh joyce said oh i'll just knock a bit of a vocal in if that's okay on you know just to see what i've got and he's saying he's saying a verse and a chorus that was well the verse was um you know the lyrics were very different from what you know ended up on the the record uh but the course was pretty much uh you know what we're here today uh and it was just one verse one chorus and then we just carried on playing and that was it really uh and um so paul still had the the master the master take the cassette uh of this four track and both of us have been really nervous about it getting stolen or lost or getting into the wrong hands as these things do sometimes um and eventually uh paul actually made contact with george's office it was only a few years ago actually long before he died and said listen we just could send them back we don't want responsibility for him anymore and um uh and george sent back he's uh um he called uh his own gold disc for for um carlos whisper actually george's and he sent it to us so that was really nice that's a lovely thing to do oh and i think yeah paul jokes that um he said there was a note in it i think when he got it and he said that uh it said i'm like listen i didn't want to insult you with money so we thought you'd give you this which would be a nice keepsake paul just said you could have insulted me with money it would have been fine don't worry but yeah it's very nice to her to have that and and paul was very gracious enough to to share it between us and you know you have it do you have it do you have it or something i haven't got a hear paul's got it at the moment yeah so it's uh yeah you're taking turns to hang it up on the wall well sort of yeah i think it stays with paul most time to be quite honest it's you know you know how these things are you i certainly wouldn't bring it in a house where the builders in and everything at the moment so yeah so yeah you tend to be you tend to be cautious with these things but that was a night it was just a nice thing for him to do and uh yeah it was very very pleasing but uh yeah it was quite quite easy that's the great thing about being in the music industry is that we all have our own little memories which we take to our graves which will always be there and we can always look back on them and to relish in that past and those stories which will always make us smile you know do you find those because sometimes it's i mean listen i'm you know i'm just a guy that played on it years and years and years ago but you you can be you know i identified as the bloke that did that and you know because you you wouldn't play with flock of seagulls didn't you yeah so do you ever get the that's the flock of seagulls guy well yes and no thing is i wasn't and i don't i was never an original member of the band i just i was that's how i really started my musical career i mean properly yeah when i say properly i mean i was playing for years before but when i was 20 21 when i met them when i went to america that was that was a really big thing for anyone to could do at that age to join a big band that just won a grammy award and you know we were followed absolutely everywhere in the united states uh and i was just a keyboard player and backing vocalist for the band but yeah people do um do mention it i mean it's i'm proud that i've done that that i did that and made some good friends there to this day you know keep in touch with some of them and i've got some great photos and great great great memories of that tour i mean it was wonderful and yeah that's right i mean people it's your history she always be proud of your history whatever it may be you know um whether you play for a band that used to be very famous like we did or or whatever it is it's it's what makes us what we are now and all those memories um you know are so important and those meeting those people at that moment in time have created where we are now and it will continue i find it fascinating within the industry because we're all connected somehow in this industry it's not just through music but through the people that we know and we meet and we work with and uh it's interesting how things pan out and how if we do oh george wrote a song about it different corner turned different corner we never would have met i mean obviously that's a love story but you can apply that to anything really can't you so yeah absolutely so what's your proudest moment then yeah musically that's a hard question i think um i think just doing what i'm doing uh making money out of music still to this day and doing what i love doing uh performing singing playing keyboards um being involved writing music composing working with different artists going on the road uh being in the studio learning how to stream just just it's like you're like a kid in the toy shop surrounded by toys you know boys you know what it's like it's like you run studios you know it's great yeah and uh which i'll talk about in a moment but me personally it's um uh i think everything everything even even the mistakes that we make um are very important as long as you recognize that they're mistakes and you did something wrong or did something that you shouldn't have done uh you know went down the wrong road or thought you were doing something good and it didn't turn out so good um that's also good because without that we wouldn't be where we are we would just go down the road of living life thinking we're the best and we're not we're all the same we're just it's just recognizing where how good we are within our field of of entertainment of of our talents and and nurturing that and and uh moving forward with that i think i think the success which is a very interesting word i think is i think to be successful isn't how much money you've got in the bank or or uh or anything materialistic it's it's if you're happy doing what you're doing that is a success you know so for me i feel successful i'm happy doing what i'm doing i'm not rich at all i have what i need you know living a humble life that's the end of that conversation what about you i mean um what what is your what is your is it's a hard question to answer what is your greatest experience what would you say is your greatest achievement um i mean yeah i agree i sort of agree with you in that you know to still be active in in the industry and still be focused on the industry whichever direction i come from is is a really a wonderful feeling and a continued successes as you uh rightfully pointed out there um i i think i was probably referring to like given moments and and actually all right and i think no no it's fine it's fine it was what was interesting to me is that everybody that i've uh worked with or done stuff with or you know friends and family family give me such a tough time about it but the whole you know the whole ram thing is you know almost like the legacy when i had the honor to play with some amazing people and actually even um done things really recently that i'm so proud of are doing i'm working with uh you know uh certain certain individuals is so i was lucky enough i mean given moments like uh i ended up working with uh james brown funky people on on a track which was just absolute i mean that i i thought i'd actually genuinely died and gone to music heaven it was just amazing to play with those guys i learned more about groove in two and a half hours than i did in the rest of my life they were just amazing uh to have done that and and um uh actually and then go to the other end where i did a track recently with a couple of friends of mine and aaron liddard was playing sex on it and that was a as i say a marcus miller uh cover and that's a song or a it's not a song at all it's a piece of music that i've always always loved and always tried to play and and because i had to focus and get it down and work on the track you know quite intently because i knew i was going to record it you know at long last after 30 years of playing you know i achieved it so that was an incredibly proud moment as well and i think it's just all these little moments that you know that rise to the top that i i just sort of really love and you know it's quite cool yeah having worked with townsend and sorting his studio out things like that was you know a real proud moment as well yeah sorry i'm not jen's though i've met chenzo but you haven't done too much with him but um but yeah peter and and you know just helping um some artists you know with their studios and and picking the right gear for them and and and just doing cool things like that can actually be really really fulfilling you know lying on the other side or they call you back after going i just you know i just checked these out there you know it's amazing this is it's exactly what you said it was so you know rather than yeah you told me you saw me a pile of crap dave you know so um yeah those are those can be just as you know rewarding i think so often it's what surrounds it as much as the actual you know um you know the actual musician side of things if you like yeah we're talking of studios actually that's a really interesting subject seeing as you're supplying studio equipment let's talk a little bit about that because that's something that absolutely fascinates me and i i i love the subjects anything to do with equipment like this so i could pick your brains here for the next few hours but i'm sure lots of it sorry i have plenty of the gear yeah um well basically the question i have is um going back 20 30 years even 40 years now we will remember how studios used to be you know what we used to use in those days we had lots of very heavy equipment heavy mixing tests power amps everything was just weighed 20 times as much as it does now if not more and you had walls and walls of modular equipment special effects reverbs limiters you name it compressors you know you know the story um and they used to cost you know upwards of a million pounds some of these big studios in those days which is a huge amount of money then maybe not so much now if you look at if you think about it but then it was a fortune and to rent them it was very expensive to rent the studio which because this equipment cost so much but say going back 40 30 years to the present day how would you say studio studios have changed bearing in mind that so much is done by software these days so how how do you how did you see it change and how how much easier is it now to to set up a studio for somebody that hasn't done it before if they want to get started especially young people that want to get into the music industry and they want to have a simple setup and then develop it slowly and add to it in a modular sort of way how would they start and where what do you think is the the ultimate leading up to the ultimate studio where would you start um yeah i think um well technology has has changed many worlds i mean look at video look at you and i talking now on on zoom um and and i i i can see you know your picture there is excellent and that's that's off your mac i suppose not it's not like you're using a you know a hundred thousand pounds camera to to film so you know and you know the studio is the same thing you know you as you rightfully say in in the early days we had you know a tape recorder which was you know mounted with two inch tapes and had to be aligned every morning and you know before the session and uh and and then the tape last thing was it 30 minutes about half an hour you were and that was just to that was just the recording you know that that wasn't the console as he rightfully said the dynamics or the effects or or whatever and and i and so i think yeah of course like video like telephones like anything like the typewriter you know what happened to the typewriter you know they've all developed you know the technology has developed and the compute the computer has allowed us to achieve amazing things in a an incredibly high incredibly high level um and with great ease so actually i think and this is a bizarre thing to say i suppose but i think it's more about the way music's developed rather than how the gears developed i think the gear is just the tool and it's how people use the gear that always make the difference so because it's so accessible and so easy now it's absolutely down to the user to to produce something and you know whereas before in the in the studio you could go and perform but you needed an engineer that knew his stuff who was able to manage the session um was then he was able to mix the track and was able to then master the track like now it's really you know that people could just do it on their laptop as you said before uh and and have it on spotify or or you know itunes or wherever within you know a matter of hours so i think although the gear has changed it's not changed anywhere near as much as the way the industry has changed that that the the gear the the you know the internet everything or interweb as we like to say has has um has changed the music industry as a whole and and that's everything from making music through to distributing music through to selling music through to getting new fans through to all sorts of different things that have far more influence than you know a a piece of dynamic or you know a compressor going from that into your computer so they're just tools and but they're nice tools they're fun tools and they're great tools so uh yeah and and yeah i think the purists among us still like hardware we still like a good mic pre with a you know a decent compressor and an eq whereas i would suggest that i've got to be careful how i say this a particular genre let's say and i'm quite happy to work exclusively with software and that that's like everything from instruments through to processing yeah i'm trying to be really cautious here but you know listen it doesn't matter it's know it's about this is still today actually this is the consistent uh or the or the constant through through the period that we've just spoken about it is still about the song it's still absolutely about you know if it's a if there is a vocal and if there's a band it's still about the performance even though that has been polished to within a millimeter of its life there is performance out there still um but yeah i still think it's about the song and and if these tools allow us to be more creative and come up with you know better or more con you know will be to allow you to be more um uh consistent with you know with your production and and and um your songs then you know great that's what they're there for yeah yeah you know it's about it's still about the music it's still about the song it's just how we do it changes all the time it continuously evolves uh as we go along i think so yeah yeah it's very interesting i mean i remember back in the very early 90s i bought this little pen not this one another one has lasted well yes yes great yes it says chat about penzis and it had a little recording button on the top you press record and you can record your voice for about 15 seconds or 10 seconds for me that was amazing and it was the first time that's when chip started getting smaller and smaller and you could actually record audio and it was quite good quality and you could just it's like a note-taking thing it cost me about 20 or 30 pounds a lot of money in those days and i love my gadgets and i bought this pen and all i could what i was thinking about was somebody's got to invent a recording system where you can just record called the instruments onto a disk and of course yeah shortly after that here we are you know that's that is it we're recording onto disks computers got faster processors got faster so bearing that in mind that that evolution from little chips where you can record a few seconds of voice to recording infinite amounts of very very high quality digital audio um and as many tracks as you want um where do you think technology will go i know we can't look into crystal ball but do you have it do you have any thoughts about where you think it's going or where you would like it to go for the future where it's going to evolve into it it is interesting and um but i i i think what we have we we continue to see some real um development over the last few years actually but not in the areas that you would necessarily think about um you know one of the things we all still need is microphones we all still need microphones we all still need speakers yeah uh monitors we all still need headphones if you if you work in that environment there are certain things that we must have yeah and that carries on but what's been sort of interesting in the last few years is that things like um it's actually connectivity so you know usb microphones for example they are they are a good tool for the for the rights uh for the right application and at the right time um so those sorts of developments have been interesting um i actually think a lot of the real step forwards have just not been in in the muse the music industry i think they've been in the recording side but in things like podcasting yeah things like uh um mastering actually although that's you know obviously still um the music industry but yeah certainly podcasting certainly the world of voice overs uh and the the the narrative or the spiteful word sorry just one second that's right i'm just gonna wait oh hi there how are you sorry i'm just on a podcast a little polishing lines you might want to cut that bit sorry i love a cup of tea no problem yeah yeah i've never met before they've just gone out the door and that's right so let me just say let me cut back to that so um so uh so yeah like the the world of um our podcasting and uh is taking significant steps and actually it's sort of almost like radio broadcast being brought it broader uh brought in uh to work online so to speak so things like you know road of what out there their road cast there and uh which is literally just you know a great little desk with all your all your cues and you can bring in phone lines and and you know mic lines and everything so that sort of technology is a a real real pace um the connect connectivity between um video and and audio so you know as musicians we can now just perform uh you know to make something for for um you know youtube or whatever in in such an amazing way uh that we could just never do before and you know youtube has actually pushed that on i mean youtube has not been around for a long time was it when we got about 10 years yeah 10 15 years so i think it's about 12 or 13 years isn't it i'd have to check but um you know that demand has driven you know the the the technology if you if you like uh and so as a result now you know literally anybody can make a video and especially musicians i mean i've now i'm playing bass on all these different sessions and the half of them are going yeah can you now put that on video please because we want to cut that together and put it on youtube so i think there's been a lot of development in there so i think if i was going to put some money down on you know what the next phase was if you like i i think whatever it is it will be involved with video there will be a cross section zoom the company not the zoom that you and i run now but zoom the um the japanese company that makes lots of recording devices and they just recently brought out a a a bunch of different camera stroke audio devices that you could literally just put there record your guitar sing and you would have a performance that you can put on uh youtube that's quite comfortable so i think yeah there's going to be lots more of that as time time goes on because it's it's all driven by demand is you know it's whatever's you know required or whatever people are looking to do we've we've just released actually so i will talk about studio space here every second yeah so please do so there are two or three things that you know that prove that point so to speak so um so at studio space where i am uh the managing director yeah um one one of the things i really want to do is to find salute real genuine solutions to real genuine problems uh and and and there are plenty of problems out there but there are i could not believe it let me tell you a few right now [Laughter] yeah and one of them actually which is grown out of actually i started to design it before covid hit um but as kobe hit it became very apparent that this product was was required and that was you know um to have um a uh a solution or sorry a a a portable vocal booth if you like so to have a an acoustic environment or a good acoustic environment is really really difficult um you know even in large studios even um even if you've got a small studio just sticking foam on the wall does not make it a good uh vocal environment there's all sorts of issues that you can you know that you can uh suffer understanding waves when you've got corner in a room they're whether it's treated or not the the waves that that corner and and take longer to come out so if you have a microphone in the middle then you've got the direct signal and you've got all these other sort of sounds going on around and it just messes up the sound in lots of different ways so what i wanted to do is to to make a portable vocal booth that people could effectively set up whether it's at their home in the garage in a studio wherever but get a really really good sound so um we came up with uh i think called the portable vocal group the pvb and that in itself i mean it is i mean that is a genuine solution this this literally means that you can be anywhere as long as you've got some room because it is it's still quite big um you know this this will take all those issues away so when you put a microphone in there you're listening to the the source signal which is either the voice of the guitar or whatever you're playing in there rather than the rest of the room um and that alone is as simple as it is you know it's huge it makes such a such a difference you know it's massive so those sort of things uh are i mean things like acoustics are becoming much more important now because so many more people are working from home so many more people have built a little a little studio down the bottom of the garden or off the back of the house or whatever and you have to be able to treat it you have to be able to to do something recently do you think that um technology the way it's going will be able to emulate those sounds that are um taken out by the use of an acoustic treated system like the one you have in other words what i'm trying to say is bearing in mind that there are the technology is always there to to make sales better do you think we will always need that kind of equipment um well let me ask you a question let me ask you a question do you think we need auto-tune or melodyne do i think we need it um it's got its uses for sure yeah yeah well it's probably the same with a device that will treat a room you know yeah i mean what i mean is sorry that was i didn't mean to put you on the spot there what i meant was that you know there will always be those sorts of solutions come out there there will always be um you know a tuna a um an automatic guitar tune there will always be these things but my personal view is those things as soon as you do it you are treating it it will never sound the same as you know the original yes absolutely it's just never going to be the same i will argue that until until the council i know i i i absolutely agree with you i mean it's uh as a singer you can't be a great room where you you can hear a totally dead sound where you can add the better the best delay whatever you got i mean i i i cannot wait to get to studio where i've got the most amazing microphone and sound booth and it is priceless you can't beat it uh but there will be there will be yes there are sort of solutions that will help you already to be fair but um you can always tell the difference yeah and also is that if you [Music] if you take a voice that's slightly out of tune you know it's math mathematics yeah it knows that if you're if you want to you know if you want to you want to take this note to a c and it's sort of c flatty sharpie you know the algorithm knows that it can move it to the c if i put it there it'll bring the perfect pitch now what it does to the signal is you know questionable it might actually sound okay but if you use a lot of it then you get that that sort of envelope sounds uh or whatever so you know that that's that's preference and you know it's a subjective thing i suppose but it will do the job and it will do the job perfectly you tell it to go to a c the difference with acoustics is that there is no i i suppose the the perfect c if you like is to get the microphone sounding exactly how you want it but that is still much more subjective than a perfect note and treating your room would be different from treating my room will be different from treating a village hall you know there are if there are so many uh variations out there or variants within a room to be to be honest that i can't imagine a single plug-in doing i can imagine it will clean up the area um i mean there's in the same way there's mic modeling you know and guitar modelling you know yeah and this actually some amazing guitar modeling out there or absolute guitar amp modelling yeah um but yeah for something like um it's easier to apply ambience than it is to take it away i think yes yeah i mean i i i crave to have just a perfect vocal sound it's it is um it's a holy grail isn't it just to get that amazing sound put it on the record um and it enhances performance as well it's not just the same i think it's inspiring yeah yeah exactly it's like when you've got the great guitar sound or great keyboard sound it makes you play better because you just yeah it feels great you play with it you're confident and and that's the same with a vocal i suppose is is that if you've got a great environment and it feels right i mean i certainly get that from voice over artists who have struggled have been like doing voiceovers literally with quilts over their heads and things like that to try and drive the sound yeah and then try to do a talking book or there are some devices online that are best avoided for that for that reason yeah absolutely but um yeah it's an interesting concept chris i'm i'm going to go reagan i'm going to start programming see if i can come up with something oh no no no please don't that's because i haven't called the the mars anti-ambi [Laughter] i was actually looking at uh um a couple two three years ago i was thinking of building a booth in here uh you know a proper booth it's just too big but the one that you have is is amazing and we'll we'll put links down to down below to uh yeah to click on it and have a look thank you yeah it's just it's imperativeaudio.com you can see it there yeah or actually it's on studio spares.com you can go there as well and just put pvb in the search engine it'll come up but uh yeah it's it it is cool and it makes a difference and yeah i'm very proud of it actually if i'm honest with you it's quite a crowning moment for me it's very nice when did it come out actually um so we we did like a pre-launch um just around uh december with um a a a voice-over um organization which we work with um and i think actually we had a we had about 80 80 people on the webinar and we immediately i think we sold 28 that night yeah because everybody just got the value of it because the difference is when you're there you know it's actually maybe i should have done it at the studio space i could have shown you because when you're talking like this and then you walk into a booth the mic there and you hear it it's just it's instant you know you could be listening to you know a bbc um well i i heard i saw the video which people can can link to from here and uh of course at the end when you you walk away from it you can hear the difference and it's phenomenal yeah i mean it really does prove the point yeah absolutely yeah yeah it's good and actually there's a if if you go on imperativeaudio.com sit there you see that video and then further down there's another video that shows that the lads start putting it up and taking it down again which is quite cool because it shows you how well it folds up and and you know and how you can put it away is it just one size or do you have a smaller size as well yeah that's a good question so for example for a desk well actually you can put that on the desk because um because it's five legs what you can do is actually bring up the back three and and then actually it goes around which is what a lot of vo uh artists do and talking book or um is that the term i'm not sure anyway uh podcasters or voiceover voice performers yeah and yeah podcasters because they want to sit down so um so the back legs retract and you could you just put it onto your onto your tabletop effectively and then the um the two legs at the uh the entrance of the the booth can then carry on and you can have them on on the floor um and yeah and then you have a boot a perfect booth at the um on the tabletop we we looked at so when i was designing it we did different sizes just to see how effective it was and actually the where we ended up was that was where we got the best readings that's where we've got the best performance um bearing in mind it's open behind you and it's open from your waist down so to speak yeah you still get movement of audio so if that comes up higher then all you're doing is killing a few reflections you'll still get that movement and it will still hit the mic at the moment it's the perfect height and circumference to to give you that great great sound um if we go smaller and more open we're close to a reflection filter really and it does nothing more than cut out a couple of reflections at the back end um which and it's fine for that but if you if you compare that to the pvb it's a world apart an absolute world apart so yeah um we're looking at i have a couple of other designs in mind um and we are looking a couple of bits uh um but i'm afraid i can't talk about those at the moment okay but uh hopefully in the near future then we'll have some more products from you yeah that would be yeah you will yeah it's um uh yeah you will but it's a case of when it's very tough out there with manufacturing and shipping at the moment so it's really hard yeah where is it made it's actually made in china um well mostly in china these days aren't they yeah yeah i mean it's it's really sort of quite difficult yeah this is quite interesting so here we go this is a this is a good question so i i remember so we've just bought a couple of microphones out from imperative audio as well as one called the lucent and one called the vocaster and the lucid is a condenser multi-pattern condenser with a 10 uh 10db pad on it and uh low cut as well and it's a great little mic and um and if you do a mic like that it's almost like you must sell it at four to five hundred pounds and say it's from you know either the uk or america or whatever and we've had that uh this mic that was made in china we've had it lined up with five or six other microphones and done blind tests and rarely does that might come i think once it came first but rarely does it come in the bottom three it's always near the top now what happens is when you tell somebody they say oh where's it made and you say china wrong right and it's what's wrong with making it in china uh and they'll say well it's chinese rubbish i said well where's your tv made where's your fridge components come from where half the things in your house come from but you know that's a you know it's not about where it's made it's with with it's the quality and you know the you know that that's in the product that really matters because the chances are in fairness we wouldn't be you wouldn't be wearing those headphones have that mic or all the computer that we're talking on exactly yeah just about everything's made in china because it's such a big country and they have got the resources to to make these products yeah at a very much cheaper price than we can in the west yeah that's just a certain extent it's changing at the moment because um and how long that's for a covid has done some strange things to manufacturing and i i see all these i hear all these conspiracy theories about china starting kovid because it was good for their manufacturing and their workforce which is absolutely rubbish i mean it's actually not helping them at all and if you then add the various taxes that you if you're shipping into america or anywhere or from any uh asian state i think but yeah primarily china and they stick 25 on the the pricing as well um so it's actually becoming quite expensive and if you then look at shipping uh i'm the price of metals and aluminium and specifically which is rocketed for them if you then look at shipping and actually even being able to get a container to put anything in at the moment um and if you then put brexit on top of that and then the series canal incident the other week but we're lucky we've got any goods coming in at all that's true and all that does is push prices up so then the question is oh actually could we make product a in the uk or in europe even or whatever so we keep our eyes on that constantly we're not there yet and maybe we will be maybe we might be i suspect it will calm down next year and you know all the prices will come back down again and they'll be they'll be trying to hit us up for all sorts of different things then yes but at the moment yeah it's it's an interesting time i think we're all going to see price increases on lots of different products especially in the music industry because everybody's struggling to get stuff in and um do you have any any ambitions for for the near future any unfulfilled dreams that you wish to pursue within the music industry that you want to take to play bass for you chris all right apart from playing baseball yeah there's two or three things i'll hold you to that thank you i would be more than pleased to do that um yeah i i think what i particularly love at the moment is just playing with people if i'm really honest i have no desire to go on you know a two-year tour with a a major star or anything i'm just i i love my life if i'm honest with you um but i do like playing with different people and um i mean i got to play with a guy called ellis hall um an american artist who was in tower power and and you know and yeah this guy's absolutely amazing and you know to go and play with him that was at the namm show actually what was he playing sorry what was he playing um he's a keyboard player yeah we're going to check about ellis hall actually if you go to youtube and um i've got a little channel on there called wesley on bass if you go and look at that there you you'll see my very wide performance with him okay if you put that link down i'll put that link down here yeah i'll give it to you because so basically what happened was um so ellis hall is that is the man that played with tower power i mean he's worked with everybody from stevie wonder i mean his buddies with stevie i believe and and actually i think ellis was the only artist to be signed to um uh to which label was it now oh i come on the label now uh but yeah yeah listen he's been around for years he's worked with so many so many artists so many like great classic artists and and every time i i i saw him on facebook the other day and um he uh you know candy dolph was there playing with him and then he was doing pictures with him and michael mcdonald and and everything so he's just one of those universal players um he was the first to be the only person to be signed to ray charles's album by ray charles himself when he was around ellis is also blind and and just an incredible musician but has the soul of an angel i mean just his voice is just astonishing and yeah and um anyway he turned up at nam and i was working with a company called rme at the time who made amazing audio interfaces i have one right in front of me that's right what have you got i've got the rme fireface which one the fireface the fireface ucx ucx yeah i have one of them beautiful very very good incredible yeah yeah and they're drivers rockstars best in industry i think i mean top quality absolutely i agree with it and so anyway the um yeah so we were he was going to be a guest on the stand and i i was there and actually somebody who worked for rme said oh you must meet dave and and then he had heard about my history and said come and guess with me i said well would you mean come and guess with you and he said oh yeah we'll do some tracks because he was going to demo on the stands and if you've been to nam chris no i haven't actually all right i was just i've never ever been because i've always normally i was always working at that time oh it's a great experience and plus it's in you know you get to go to anaheim or oh yeah absolutely yeah in the middle of winter so that's always a bonus but um what you've got to understand is that you could be um you could be there you could be standing there chatting to somebody one minute and then stevie wonder will come past or you know plenty of those videos on youtube actually yeah i was talking to nathan east last time i was i mean it's just anybody can pop up so yeah yeah yeah so he's it's quite cool um but sure enough he he said yeah come and play with me and he was like playing organ and piano and i was on base i said we've not got a drum because no no come on but it'll be great we'll just do it and i and i said yes foolishly i said yeah okay and because i the thought of playing with ellis hall was just quite exciting for me so he uh we sat down and i said what we could do he said ah don't worry i'll start just join in so yeah and he's and he wasn't going to do any 12-bar stuff oh no no no he was straightening with a higher love i think or something with steven wonder so yeah it was rather demanding and you can see the panic in my face if you watch the video um but to do that stuff is really exciting and i want i would love to just play with lots of different people and have people come and guest on stuff that i do and just enjoy music for the sake of music personally that's i have no desire to be a millionaire or anything you know it's just i love great teams and great performances absolutely and a long way to continue um absolutely for us both yes it's cool for us all well have you so dude sorry are we near our time i suppose we are but i just soon i just wanted to ask you yeah so during covid in this last year and i know you're a very active person online anyway but i mean what where do you feel that you've connected with your audience uh in in a new way the the that you wouldn't have done before kobe is there anything new that's come out before you absolutely i mean i mentioned this in our in our group meetings that we're both involved in and absolutely i've learnt to use equipment for streaming i've had to learn from the very beginning just over a year ago now and it's been a real learning curve learning how to use obs studio green screens special effects stream decks a10 mini pros and things like this and that's just for the visuals of course then you've got the audio so you've got to make sure the audio's best quality that's going to be passed through into into the obs studio system uh how people are going to view it are you going to have any delays any millisecond problems you're going to have to dial out sort all that out get the computer up to scratch and yeah it's been a real learning curve i think a lot of people around the world have been doing that and um i was going to mention it earlier because we were talking about um about this kind of thing earlier on about studio equipment and and so forth and uh you were talking about how things will develop in the future and you believe that these units like for example the zoom with the what was it the uh um yeah there's there's a few these are all in one all in one units that can make it easier for you to video yourself and have top quality audio well the people that i was bought a lot of this equipment from who are one of the uk's top companies um they they completely and utterly sold out of a10 minis of a lot of the blackmagic design cameras all the expensive cameras costing tens of thousands they sold out of those people just buying everywhere they just couldn't get it green screen i got a green screen down here you couldn't get them for a lot of money before that green screen i had to buy a green a green curtain yeah uh that's the only way it you just could not get them anywhere um so what i've learned is to just use the equipment that i eventually obviously went once again china these these are made in china this is some of the world's best equipment made in china so we had to wait for it to be flown over from china i mean as you know they've got some of the most incredible factories out there um yes many many years ago there was a bit of a stigma with products made in china maybe from the 60s and 70s or 80s but now i mean that is just they are right up there that incredible and perhaps off to a lot of the companies over in china for making some of the most amazing equipment the quality is superb the quality of the plastic and the rubber used and the metals and it's it's absolutely top whack and um quality is is is the one of the secrets don't go for anything less than the best quality when it comes to this kind of equipment because if you buy buy buy it cheap you buy it twice always yeah we're just thinking that very phrased yeah so yeah it is true yeah we we had a that's a similar thing i've been working with pete mills and pete harris um on the live lounge tv project and then that then because um pete mills uh uh has um central studios danny gilford and i'm looking about eight cameras in and that is wonderful things with with streaming and of course they have the he has a whole uh um uh second source system and pro tools system in there so they're literally able to to film and record multi-track at the same time and to mix on the fly if it's going out to a stream or or to to video band and then do post-production or both actually they can do a stream and then do the post after yeah so you know they're you know and they're doing some really interesting things and and again this goes back to personally i think the whole demand situation because i know we want to go out play live again and we probably will this summer but i'm i'm personally not convinced that audiences will come flocking back for some time yet there's a real confidence issue out there so yeah this whole demand that's being made uh cremated was created um bizarrely i think you're right the first time about being created you know that's driving that technology again isn't it so yeah then i think we'll see more and more streaming i think audiences will demand different things of their stream rather than just the performance uh and well i i did one with um a couple of weeks ago where i was guest and you know but part of the experience was and that was at live lounge as well and the part of the experience was you know as a vip guest you know they they did a a post show zoom call like a you know like a vip thing and and gave away some stuff in the competition and it just made for a whole experience rather than just watching you know the stream and typing which is love which is nice nothing wrong with that but to then have that extra experience and extra experience after and maybe able to win something and and engage and connect which i think we're going to see much more of that that sort of thing as well and that's people are starting to demand that and artists need to to buy into it and start working with it and understanding it yeah i'm absolutely fully behind anything to do with making it as easy as possible first especially for musicians to to to get out there and to get their music out whatever it may be there are so many new apps coming up now new companies that are developing platforms um some good some not so good but yeah i think it's it's a big melting pot now in the next six to twelve months i think it's gonna it's gonna be really i think it's a very exciting time actually because um there is a huge demand now and it's not gonna go away even if we were to come out the pandemic tomorrow which we won't you know it'll be here at least another year or two before things really start settling down and the economy starts to you know get better um but at least we're on the way out of it on the biological time frame which is the most important thing i think streaming and and being able to appear in someone's on someone's phone in high quality audio visual with text with with uh all the information on the screen using obs studio or for example the stream deck is fantastic yeah yeah i mean it's absolutely amazing what you can do just press a button and you've got you know whatever you want on the screen or just power up the computer everything can be done at the push of a button backdrops videos i mean i've got mine here you know programmed up with the help of a very good friend of mine i had um with here i think i think stream deck should be paying me for this there you go i mean uh there's a car there's a cable here send them an email quick yeah i think i should um yeah if anyone wants to buy and straight up stream date they just click but yeah it's a sponsorship i am absolutely open sponsorship studio spares owners please take notes absolutely yeah um though but it's um i think it's i'm very excited by it i i i i was saying many many months ago when i started getting into the streaming that you know it felt right it felt well now you can do what what you want you can just perform the music that you want push it out there and and just get it right and you know there's no filter it's all live and and people can pay for it you can give it for free you can create a community people can talk on the screen and they can chat and they can chat to you they can chat to other people and it's a new way of communicating and i think it was a necessity waiting to happen because we couldn't go out we couldn't go to the pub we couldn't go to clubs we couldn't work as musicians we couldn't go to the shops we were locked in for months after month all over the world people were craving that human connection and streaming just came out into its own and it will continue for sure absolutely yeah no i i think really it'll it'll just get bigger and bigger and i think there'll be um uh lots of hybrid gigs i was actually talking to alex ellis last night um for a while we were talking about this and the whole hybrid gig is gonna is gonna take over i think where you could maybe have vips at physically at the concert uh and then you have um the the stream uh the whole thing being streamed you know uh at the same time so it's a bit of a hybrid uh hybrid gig if you like um so i think more and that also allows you to bubble your vips as well even during this period you know you can decide it can work so i think we'll see more of that as time goes on absolutely yeah very good well it's been a fascinating hour or so dave yeah we could go on forever like this probably could absolutely yeah yeah absolutely i could talk to you for for god knows how much longer two minutes yeah another 10 seconds yeah no it's been great um it's it's been wonderful hearing about uh your your past and what you're doing now and and the the incredible um i was going to say gadgets.gadgets

the devices that you've got for sale the studio space for me they're gadgets i love they're all gadgets and they're brilliant everything's a gadget yeah yeah i'll definitely put all the links down below to your website into the to the um what'd you call it again what was the actual name of the um the pvp yes of course um it does look amazing and i i urge anyone watching this who who's remotely interested in in recording their vocals top professional level to check it out because it really it looks and i'll probably end up getting one once i've rearranged the studio here for sure it's a lot it's a lot yeah we will definitely talk definitely um well it's been fascinating than

2021-04-30 07:53

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