MMIWG action plan, Delta variant, Air Canada executive travel | The National for June 3, 2021

MMIWG action plan, Delta variant, Air Canada executive travel | The National for June 3, 2021

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good evening i'm andrew chang and i'm adrian arsenault tonight a new national plan and more promises for a path to reconciliation that document does not speak for me as a nehewa woman and as a survivor at issue looks at the difficult week after kamloops also tonight the race against a rising covet 19 variant we see the storm coming and we know where it's going to land cbc news investigates internal complaints from air canada employees about the international travel of company executives and league judgment for an end of game hit they are taking these hits very seriously we'll hear from analysts players and fans this is the national the timing is coincidental the symbolism powerful a week ago a report from kamloops re-lit the national reflection on residential schools today the idea of reconciliation is again in the spotlight a new national plan in response to the tragedy of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls and the date is significant exactly two years ago an inquiry into the issues released a landmark report and today the federal pathway report promises transformative change over several years but it's already facing tough scrutiny now the government says it designed this action plan to be a kind of living document one that can grow and be adapted but as olivia stefanovic tells us for some of those still reeling from loss it brings little resolution after two years of waiting for an official response judy anderson watched as the national action plan was made public but it brought her no closure with my sister there are no leads there's no clues she wants to know what happened to her sister shelley may anderson who disappeared in northern ontario more than a decade ago there are no investments that can bring back the lives lost or that can heal people's pain the prime minister seemed to acknowledge that but says his government is trying to do better we're taking a step forward together to make the transformative change necessary the federal component of the action plan pledges to revitalize indigenous languages transform the delivery of health care improve law enforcement training and designate indigenous policing an essential service to pay for the promises the government set aside more than two billion dollars in the budget what reason does any indigenous person in canada have to trust the government the inquiries chief commissioner says the commitments lack timelines and costing that document does not speak for me as a nehewa woman and as a survivor krista shore was 12 years old when her mom was killed the man who took barbara and shore's life was convicted but not before police first blamed shore's brother and father if you ask me if police forces and rcmp should get more funds no they've been the big prominent piece of down playing and constructing the violence indigenous women in girl's face but shore says she finds strength in caring the story of her mother's loss i'll continue to speak truth to power okay so olivia i guess the question here is will we begin to see the results of this plan well andrew the government has already started work on some of these promises for example it's passed legislation to reform the child welfare system and protect indigenous languages but much of the work in the action plan will take longer and the government is committing to annual progress reports but for the people who continue to gather here at this memorial for kamloops laying shoes toys and flowers that isn't good enough they want action now andrew okay olivia stefanovic thank you so let's bring in chief political correspondent rosie barton so rosie how significant is what happened today to the promise of reconciliation you know it's it's a step forward it's part of the overall process but it comes after a pretty difficult week for the government where there have been questions raised about the government's commitment to reconciliation and the speed at which it's happening it can certainly point to this plan to make the case that it's committed to doing the work necessary now and into the the future but what happened this week in kamloops adrian really seemed to focus the public's mind on truth and reconciliation on holding the government to account for promises made the liberals may have also set expectations just too high given the complexity of some of these issues like improving first nations policing eliminating racism in the health care system for instance and so what about the potential political fallout they they are surely thinking along those lines for sure because the prime minister has said this is the most important relationship for him for the government for the country a lot of people uh voted for this government to support these goals remember there was a record turnout of indigenous voters in 2015 that brought the liberals a majority in part so progress is going to need to be better explained confidence that the government is making progress is going to be vital for those voters we're going to talk about all of that coming up on at issue all right it's important rosie thank you thanks now one more note before we move to other news the rcmp says it has opened a file on the kamloops residential school discovery but it says the band remains the lead at this time and it will consult on any next steps and earlier today a related call from the chair of the truth and reconciliation commission we need to ensure that there is an independent study that is done into that question of those burial sites and where they are and what the numbers are going to tell us retired senator murray sinclair told the indigenous and northern affairs committee today that while the government should not run any such probe parliament should have an oversight role in the house of commons today mps criticized air canada for paying millions in executive bonuses during the pandemic because that's the decision mps gave unanimous support to a motion condemning air canada's board for approving 20 million dollars in executive bonuses the company says it paid out 10 million during the pandemic it negotiated a federal aid package of nearly 6 billion dollars and laid off employees canada's biggest airline is also facing internal criticism cbc news has learned that some employees have complained about the travel of some executives erin saltzman tells us more already pounded by the pandemic air canada is now dealing with internal complaints about the pandemic travel of some of its top executives one criticized vice president lisa pearce an american living in toronto after she posted pictures on a company message board of her getting her second vaccine shot in the u.s before some front-line workers had access to their first a second accuses vice president mark gallardo a canadian living in montreal of vacationing in florida while quebec was under lockdown orders pandemic related travel by another senior air canada executive is also raising concern within the organization senior vice president mark nasser traveled to dubai last december and flew to florida on business this past april where he too was vaccinated none of this of course was illegal but it was contrary to government pleas to stay home cbc news has also obtained part of a recording of a virtual staff meeting during which nasser said he had used rapid testing kits to screen dinner home guests six weeks ago and we've used it for dinner parties provincial guidelines at the time did not allow visits to other households on the use of test kits air canada said our information is incorrect in a statement the airline says it doesn't comment on the private activities of its employees it points out anyone in canada can travel outside the country and says it has been very consistent in its position since the pandemic began that with appropriate precautions and by applying science-based measures travel is safe traveling during a pandemic is very problematic this epidemiologist says even with modern air filtration systems it's still possible to spread the virus on the plane in the terminal and traveling to and from the airport the concept of going to the united states to get vaccinated doesn't really trouble me getting on an airplane when you don't absolutely have to does seems it also troubles some air canada employees as well aaron saltzman cbc news dorado let's turn to the covet 19 story now and to new worries about a recent variant it is taking hold in ontario where more second doses seem to be the best hope of heading it off picadopia tells us what that means for the province's vaccination strategy the future of rapid mass vaccination opened in brampton today as the city kicks its efforts into high gear and for peel region the stakes couldn't be higher we see the storm coming and we know where it's going to land it is going to land in the region of peel within the next few weeks that storm is the delta variant how scientists now refer to the coronavirus variant that first surfaced in india health officials estimate it now makes up almost a quarter of all covid cases in ontario but in peel the delta variant is predicted to take over as the dominant strain as early as the end of the month and could spread elsewhere here's why that's worrying delta is more transmissible spreading more rapidly than the current dominant strain there's early evidence it may be more virulent leading to more severe illness and a uk study found a single dose of either the pfizer or astrazeneca vaccine is only 33 effective against illness which is less effective than with other variants so if it does gain a foothold and if it does start circulating more broadly than we could expect to see that translate into increased risk of hospitalization in the uk where the delta variant is surging second shots are an urgent priority because two doses have been shown to be more than 90 percent effective against the variant ontario needs to do the same and that's absolutely double we can up our game there by just going in more rapidly with second doses and we're absolutely able to keep this under control this time the provincial government is now considering opening up second shots to everyone to make sure that anybody who wants to receive their second vaccine can get one as quickly as possible because losing control now could undo so much progress vicodopia cbc news toronto and quebec is cutting wait times for that second dose of the covid19 vaccine in half from 16 to 8 weeks it's clear that one dose is not protecting long enough if they really want to be protected and have a good fall and we don't have combat epidemics they must get a second dose quebecers will be able to reschedule their second dose as early as monday the province hopes to have 75 percent of the adult population fully vaccinated before the end of august well today in hard hit manitoba the government began reaching out to a community wary of vaccines the province is home to about 200 000 mennonites and many have been slow to get a shot karen pauls looks at efforts to change that i'm one of those people that was totally against vaccinating but 33 year old katarina giesbrecht had a change of heart after she was hospitalized with kobit 19 and put on a ventilator i thought literally i was going to die because of the pneumonia and the covet in my lungs and when your lungs are so full and they're popping you can't breathe it's very very scary geesprecht lives in a mennonite town in a part of the province with low rates of vaccination as low as 13 percent compared to the provincial average of 63 percent there have been a few patients that even at death's door and on their death beds are in denial this doctor says almost none of his patients have been vaccinated some denied the pandemic exists even as they were dying of covid19 there's this idea that we are somehow colluding with the conspiracy that this virus is not real we've all missed traveling to see the people and the places we love today the province unveiled a new ad campaign to convince weary manitobans to get the shot as well a grant program for groups like churches or sports teams to encourage vaccination we accept and understand that this is your body and it's your right to make that decision but it's our obligation to encourage you to make the one that's best for you and best i think for manitoba and for canada as well experts say mennonites have a history of persecution by the authorities so it's crucial to recruit trusted local leaders to use their influence there's a strong emphasis in our culture on making a private decision it's my decision i made it i don't need to you know preach about it and in fact it might be considered rude to tell my neighbor and my sister or my cousin that i've done this and actually we need to get over that katharina giessrich is rolling up her sleeve for the shot next week hoping her example will nudge others off the fence karen paul cbc news winnipeg now as manitoba pushes for broader vaccine uptake it's also moved to keep many of the province's students at home for the remainder of the school year test positivity rates and the number of cases in hospital and icu are still too high to broadly reopen schools in certain parts of the province students in hot spots like winnipeg brandon and garden valley will remain at home however small groups of students will be able to return to classrooms for certain controlled meetings with teachers the commission investigating last year's murderous rampage in nova scotia today called on halifax-based frank magazine to take down leaked recordings it posted of 3911 those calls were placed on the night a man killed 13 people in the township of puerto pick while masquerading as an rcmp officer one call was from a 12-year-old boy who witnessed his parents dying nova scotia rcmp said today given the heartbreaking effect on victims families and on our employees we are publicly condemning the publication of the audio recordings the killer took 22 lives over two days before police shot him dead at a gas station now as part of the killer's masquerade his car was decked out to resemble an rcmp cruiser more than a year later cbc news discovered detailed instructions on placing those markings and decals were still readily available online that was until cbc's thomas dagla started asking questions rcmp decals like this are meant to guarantee that a police car is authentic but they played a devastating part in the massacre before the gunman went on his rampage court documents show he did research online and found a federal government website offering instructions on how to create those rcmp decals that should only be made available on a need to know basis by companies that have a security clearance these documents are from past calls for tenders when the rcmp was looking for decal suppliers but even more than a year after the attacks we found the files still readily available online they offered details like the precise colors and measurements of the decals not to mention the material needed i will tell you i'm very concerned that any individual intent on committing criminal attacks could gain access to to the decals for an rcmp vehicle or the uniform of an rcmp officer that was last year this week blair's spokesperson said the design and detail of rcmp vehicle decals have not previously been considered classified or in need of safeguarding quebec and ontario police both say they require a security clearance when putting decals out for tender while those federal documents state they did not include provisions for security there's no excuse that why that's still available tammy oliver mccurdy lost her niece emily sister jolene and brother-in-law aaron this actually puts people at risk so i don't know why 13 over 13 months later we're talking about this it's sad it's disappointing after cbc news inquired the rcmp said it would remove the files and review procurement posting procedures for items that could be used to impersonate an officer measures that could help prevent this from happening again thomas dagg cbc news toronto new brunswick has launched an investigation into the cause of a brain illness that has affected nearly 50 people and taken six lives we must examine any and all possibilities and as those possibilities evolve you know we'll certainly share them with you a nine person committee will oversee the investigation cases have been found in patients ranging from 18 to 86 years old symptoms include rapidly progressing dementia muscle spasms memory loss and hallucinations montreal took game one in last night's series opener against winnipeg but today the talk of the town was what happened in the game's final minute a vicious hit left a montreal player flat on the ice with a concussion cameron mcintosh looks at the replay the reaction and the judgment winnipeg's first game with fans in the stands final score notwithstanding an ending no one wanted to see canadians are going to clear evans watch canadians forward jake evans wrapping the puck around the empty net who then got up jets top center mark scheifele now suspended four games evans who left on a stretcher now day-to-day with a concussion he gave a thumbs up as he was wheeled off the ice so i'm glad about that it was a pretty tense time in the arena for sure from another angle evans is in the clear but vulnerable with his head down he scores just before scheifele at high speed makes the hit no attempt to play the puck my initial thoughts were it seemed like a clean hit hockey night in canada analyst parminder singh says on second look it's the contact with evan's head which is down that the nhl really wants out of the game they are taking these hits very seriously we gotta put the misfortunes around the hits hit but the fact that the matter is that the player was hit in the head uh what's taking off on a stretcher many montreal fans wanted an even tougher suspension among ex-nhlers plenty of debate all day i don't want to see mark scheifele get suspended but the right call was made on the ice a suspension is coming deservedly so if he hopped up and celebrated the goal in the corner we wouldn't nothing would be discussed it certainly amped up tension in the series earlier today scheifele's teammates insisted the hit was clean but if that had happened to one of our players i think it'd be you know your hands would be up we all know what happened last night and you know the best way to to get back at them for that is to win the series montreal leads one nothing game two goes tomorrow without scheifele and most likely without evans as well cameron mcintosh cbc news winnipeg well new york city has a new attraction a covid 19 vaccine i'm from ecuador from quito we're coming from colombia they've come from around the world to get their shots up next the trouble with vaccine tourism after renewed calls for action and new promises for change is this a turning point for reconciliation in canada at issue is here and the asian comedians determined to change the punchline and i felt like they were just laughing at me we're back in two they're not trying to drive cars through here they're trying to delete history but we will not let them delete this history well activists gathered at george floyd square in minneapolis today as crews worked to reopen the intersection where floyd was murdered by a police officer just over a year ago city officials hoped the effort would let traffic flow through the intersection again but demonstrators called the unannounced action disrespectful the white house today announced it will share 80 million unused covid vaccines with the rest of the world by the end of this month it recognizes our closest neighbors canada and mexico which received our first shared vaccines so the us is pledging 25 million doses to start about a quarter will go to canada mexico and other close allies with some kept for emergencies the other three quarters will be going to the united nations kovacs program now some people from abroad are not waiting for u.s donated doses to come to them instead they are traveling to the united states not just to sightsee but to get their shots chris reyes looks at vaccine tourism and why not everyone is putting out the welcome mat tkts in times square used to be the spot to get the hottest ticket in town but with shows shut down these days you're more likely to find tourists lined up across the street have you back in there already the hot ticket here the one shot johnson and johnson vaccine just showed our passports and we had to fill in a form and that's it almost everyone we met outside this clinic traveled to new york for the vaccine in colombia we have to wait a lot to get vaccinated so i guess we have we choose to come to new york long waits for shots in other countries have fueled a new travel trend vaccine tourism we want to enjoy everything that's great about this mayor bill de blasio has been encouraging it for weeks putting clinics like this one in popular tourist sites this is an ad from a thai travel agency selling so-called health tours to other parts of the u.s the packages aren't cheap we're talking something around you know over two thousand dollars going up to four thousand uh per person for a couple tourists are obviously thrilled to be getting their free shot right here in times square but some are troubled by the trend so it's selfishness to use vaccines for tourism it would be one thing if there were enough doses in every country to end the pandemic but there isn't they're getting vaccinated for local new yorker ronald lugo he's all for vaccines for visitors because of his daily reality those from the city want to know that you know people coming in you know we're going to be protected for germa vaccine tourism is too short-sighted there is no tourism recovery for all unless there is vaccine equity facing that challenge will be up to a small group of rich countries according to the who they hold almost 90 percent of the world's vaccine supply until then the reality is this tourists will go wherever they are welcome chris reyes cbc news new york well ahead tonight finding inspiration in an insect invasion they're climbing mountains even getting their own vaccines we're going to hear from the photographer behind it all in tonight's moment next though rosie is here with that issue hey adrian tonight we are obviously going to talk more about the politics of reconciliation to truly heal these wounds we must first acknowledge the truth so how does the truth turn into political action plus how current political leaders are reconciling with history the wrongs of the past chantelle andrew althea and karen poulier will join me [Music] to truly heal these wounds we must first acknowledge the truth and not only about residential schools but about so many injustices both past and present that indigenous peoples face canadian families are grieving the loss of children but what they haven't seen yet is swift action will the government commit to delivering the plan so that families can begin the process of healing this is a moment that demands action that demands justice it's been a week of political responses and calls for action after up to 215 remains of children were found at the site of a former residential school in kamloops today the federal government released its response to the national inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls so does any of this mark a turning point for reconciliation it's thursday and i'm here with at issue chantelle bear andrew coyne althea raj and karen pulisi joins us this week too she's an assistant professor at ryerson school of journalism former executive director of news and current affairs at aptn good to see everybody um chantal i'm going to start with you do you think that what we have talked about what has touched the nation this week is perhaps a political turning point because of you know a sense of emotion and urgency that canadians might be feeling i'm guessing it depends on how long it can be sustained it's not that politicians have not like to talk a good game on the issue but it is a fact of political life and i've covered politics for a long time that while canadians will tell poster that it really matters to them that parties talk that talk they do not punish parties for not walking the walk the talk when it comes to elections so if the feelings are within the electorate do translate into uh accountability in the ballot box yes it will make a difference but otherwise i'm not that optimistic karen watching it from where you are does it feel in any way different and that there may be i don't know different pressure placed on politicians to respond differently it feels like a lot of things have been a little different lately um i think since the murder of uh george floyd um it's really interesting that we have this 2015 royal um real commission sorry i'm thinking about the royal commission but i mean the uh truth and reconciliation commission and there just really wasn't much out of it there wasn't really much out for a long time um in reaction to the missing murdered women's inquiry and i guess we'll talk about that later but there was this huge force that came out of black lives matter and black lives matter suddenly created space to talk about indigenous issues in canada and that's been going on i think um you know really for about a year and it's that feeling that indigenous people are not having this conversation alone anymore that matters that other people are joining in that's interesting andrew it's been six years since the since the trc's 94 calls to actions we heard there and some of the clips from opposition leaders you know we need quick action swift action i don't know when you read those calls to action whether anything could be done swiftly but but how do you assess how the government's doing or done so far well in the in the days since the this latest evidence of the atrocities that took place in the residential schools it was actually a little slow to react i think uh they were a little bit off their off their game there it took them a few days to really realize the enormity with which this had landed in the general public and particularly amongst indigenous canadians uh so they were a little slow uh but i do think this is uh turned up the heat uh i don't know whether i describe it as a turning point but i think it's added some impetus uh to uh the existing thing part of which has just been described that that there's been a i think a collective opening of eyes in across north america from people who might previously have said in response to issues like this yeah but i think are more inclined to say yeah i'm listening than they might have in the past how much of it althea do you think is about uh the government's own sort of setting of expectations uh that that justin trudeau started you know way back in before 2015. uh in some ways that he i guess has followed the con he is following through or he is seeing the consequences of his very quick action so i think what you're referring to is even before the 2015 election uh the liberal leader promised that he was going to uh enact all the nine to four uh recommendations from the truth and reconciliation commission uh never mind that not all 94 had to do with the federal government but he made that pledge and i think the expectation was that the liberal government was going to move a lot faster and frankly when you heard things like no relationship is more important to me than the relationship with canada's indigenous people you can't blame the public and indigenous canadians for thinking that change was going to come a lot faster and uh in the first few months of that government it seemed like it was you know he remember he went to the united nations he declared that um the u.n declaration on the right of indigenous people was going to be enshrined in canadian law that bill actually just passed last wednesday um and then it kind of you know other priorities uh replaced it there was donald trump and there was nafta and then there was kovid um but just in the last week you know um since the news of this discovery emerged last thursday on friday the mps all agreed to pass uh two bills basically that dealt with truth and reconciliation commission recommendations um they so now there's a national day uh basically a holiday in september marking reconciliation there will be a change in the oath of citizenship um so those were two things that happened very quickly the government could have moved on them but it it chose not to make them a priority chantal you went in there um i believe those two bills uh should be commended for having passed unanimously but they amount to a lot of light lifting there's not a lot of heavy lifting involved in declaring a day of remembrance and possibly the events of this week bring us closer to a canadian consensus i.e

that if we change governments possibly the conservatives would build on what the liberals have been trying to do but that being said i do blame the public it doesn't take very long for any government to discover including this one that there is no penalty for not delivering that that canadians are quite willing to partake in the grief this week but that they don't exact from parties and leaders real action and if you are indigenous voters you do know that while your vote matters it's not gonna swing an election so uh talk is cheap and talk has been cheap on the part of voters though i will say karen in 2015 indigenous voters turned out in record numbers and and they voted against stephen harper and and in some ways for justin trudeau so they may not swing it swing the election no no they didn't swing the election but but but i think that's that is an important point karen like how much of this falls on voters to demand uh change on these issues here's what it comes down to uh the issues of residential schools when and i think there's a greater understanding of this now when you talk about colonialism and systemic racism people are starting to understand more than they have in the past that the system of education that we have now for first nations especially in cases where there are no high schools and students have to leave their home and go hundreds of miles away from their family to be educated once again in a language that's not their own a culture that's not their own and live with families but not their own that that's a continuation of that system and so it seems like when we used to have these conversations we we didn't have words for them or if we said something like systemic racism it just sounded so radical um it sounded like something no that doesn't really exist here in canada but it's starting to become part of the mainstream conversation um the the question is always these things are i i think they're more expensive than they are complicated yeah so so that's the question andrew to chantelle's point about how this sort of may set a bar and that would be the case with the plan we even saw today the action plan on mmiwg today about this how sort of sets a bar or a starting point for other political parties or other governments moving forward do you think that's the case i can't say how it wouldn't be uh you know there there is there is an expectation now that um we have to deal with this uh i agree with chantal that the public is oftentimes behind on this sometimes the public leader is ahead of their leaders sometimes they're behind but it is the job of leaders not just to respond to what is already on the public's mind but to put things in front of them to make them care about things if they're important enough and this is an issue in which frankly the honor of the country is at stake this is a terrible black mark on our collective conscience uh that we have to deal with and if we don't then we lose not only the chance of reconciliation we are our moral standing 30 seconds do you all feel i think there are ways the government can signal to the public that this is an issue that it cares about and some of them are found in the calls to justice and they can take some of the recommendations even in the action report that was uh tabled today to signal that they are taking these matters seriously that they're a point a point person that will drive the uh the fulfillment of these recommendations uh that this is going to be a lens through which it sees everything um but we haven't heard that okay we're going to take a quick break we'll be back with another round of at issue we're going to talk a little bit about this john mcdonald was an imperfect man but was still a great leader this is another part of the conversations around political leaders and our history are playing out we'll tackle that next [Music] if we want to get into uh canceling every uh figure in our history who had uh who took positions on on issues at the time that we now judge harshly and rightly in in historical retrospective but if that's the new standard then um i think almost the entire founding leadership of our country gets cancelled jason kenny defending in some ways canada's first prime minister this week after he was asked about a calgary school removing johnny mcdonald's name because of his legacy and his role in the creation of residential schools the alberta premier also penned an op-ed in the national post with a similar message so how should we handle all of that how is how does that fit into the conversation around reconciliation chantal andrew althea and karen back for one more round of at issue karen i also want to start by saying you're part of the indigenous faculty at ryerson that signed a public letter calling for the school to be renamed and remove the statue of edgarton ryerson who was also an architect of the residential school system so maybe i'll start with you because of that how much of that part of the conversation is central to reconciliation um in terms of do we get rid of things do we accept things do we move on what are your views on that uh you know jason kenny is calling it council culture it's not council culture we're not canceling anything what we're saying is who do we honor in our society and who do we hold up nobody's taking anybody out of the history books and in fact by taking down some of these statues you're actually making history not a racing history and so yes it is an act of reconciliation to start thinking really if you want to honor somebody who had such an impact for centuries like sir john a macdonald did upon indigenous people yeah i mean it's such a it's sort of the other side of the reconciliation conversation andrew i don't know and we've had moments of it and now it seems to have returned what what do you make of where that has to go well i'm sympathetic to jason kennedy's position generally that i think as a general proposition we should be looking at the whole of a person's record not just the worst thing they did but i think we have to recognize the context here in the context is this is a singular event this is the worst thing in our history uh by far not just in the scale and severity of it but the duration of it the fact that it went on for a hundred more or more years the fact that it only really stopped a couple of decades ago and the fact that we're living with the legacy of it today so when you look at that in that context uh it seems to me it's a it's a different kettle of fish that that it is asking a lot and it is i think the point is that it's not that you're pinning the blame for this on that one person or those those few people i think it's more of an act of because sir john a stands for the country in a way i think it's more an act of accepting blame generally i think what people are trying to do is to say who we want to honor and celebrate and also how do we want our history to be remembered and to andrew's point as well all these leaders are multifaceted they may have done great things but they also did horrible horrific things that should be explained and i think that we can use the statues uh to explain that history as well to use them as an education about the things that they did that you know we are impressed by but also the things that are a dark mark on their history on our history and what we can learn from that last word to you chantal i'm with andrew uh this isn't a uh there were black marks but uh everything else kind of saves it uh kind of thing we do give statues to people to honor them suppose for one second that we start as we i believe are going to be doing and are doing to teach history in a different way in this country what will our kids and our grandkids ask of us when they see statues of sir johnny mcdonald and this isn't just about racist views it is about the creation of a system what country elevates people who put systems like that in place to the place of honor that is a statue in a public place really thoughtful conversation tonight thank you all i appreciate it thank you very much andrew chantal althea and karen now let's go back to andrew and adrian in toronto well after decades of stereotypes and accents asian comedians are changing the punchline i felt like they were just laughing at me the moment that changed everything for one young comedian next i'm elaine chao in for jamie poisson tomorrow on cbc's daily news podcast front burner truth and reconciliation commissioner marie wilson on what action is needed after the discovery of unmarked graves at a former residential school in kamloops subscribe wherever you get your podcasts well there's a new generation of asian comics changing the landscape of what's funny no more silly voices and stereotypes the humor is in the telling of their own stories and as eli glasner shows us who they're telling those stories too thank you for coming i'll see you in hell for years comedy had a crutch asian accents were a source for easy and lazy laughs my uncle in beijing he's a very corrupt even from a supposedly progressive comedian such as rosie o'donnell that monkey's my mama who surprised culture writer naveen kumar during a stand-up show she started her bit by saying i'm sorry for any there any indians in the room at which point she told the story about a doctor she puts on this or a broad indian accent and uh you know that's sort of what gets the room laughing yo go coco even asian comics have done it such as canadian anto chan who regrets his earlier material relied on stereotypes because we knew that the audiences were usually white audiences that were really excited to hear a powerful asian voice joke about stuff that they've already know the punchline of but when chan just telling the audience he was chinese became the punchline it was a wake-up call i felt like they were just laughing at me and this moment changed my entire perception of like what it was that i was doing on stage i love when people walk up to you and just guess your race now chance comedy and the stand-up scene itself is evolving this evolution into having diverse audiences and being able to share our like true stories that's something that i really believe what's also changing are asian americans speaking out protesting violence and racism i think in terms of moving forward the the momentum is in the numbers number one don't ask me where i'm really from karen chi is part of that as one of two asian writers on seth meyer's show she's excited about the new opportunities we're making more shows i think as as long as you just keep that door open and let more people tell stories sort of organically you'll get to see a lot of different kinds of them an era where the laughs come from real stories and backgrounds not just differences eli glasner cbc news toronto next on the national up close and personal with cicadas this photographer chooses insects as her inspiration it's weird our moment is next these two little guys are cicadas and although they have not gone very far they have been on many adventures all through the lens of a virginia photographer so this is a crazy year for cicadas in the united states trillions of them are emerging after 17 years underground they are noisy and messy and annoying and yet they are also an inspiration for the photographer and tonight this is our moment there they are they i have a pretty silly sense of humor and i've always loved insects i learned pretty quickly that no one shared my love of them the idea to put cicadas and silly sets came out of my kids the band is here when they saw the first cicada emerge they were not impressed at all so i gave the skaters like ride in a fire truck and my son was like so amused and he was convert like right away i've learned that cicadas hate doing gymnastics i'm used to working with very fast-moving squirmy individuals kids that they usually don't crawl out of the set like cicadas fly off like i don't you know sedate them i don't inconvenience them i just kind of play with them i never heard them they all opted for the one shot deal nature is pretty awesome and you get a macro lens and you look at them and learn so much about stuff that's like right in front of you that you never realized was there well that requires a certain amount of imagination right now but but i loved seeing the the behind the scenes footage there the final products are great but i i think it's hilarious she's deeply dedicated to this and i'm sure the neighborhood kids think she's pretty cool and if you list if you watch that tape when she was speaking every now and then you could hear this faint sound in the background the cicadas are just shouting all the time on that a little bit later that is the national for june 3rd [Music] tonight [Music] you

2021-06-07 23:48

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